Women in History
saltysojourn:

"Mad women fight back"; "Bet your ass we’re paranoid" - Psychiatric survivors during a protest in 1976

saltysojourn:

"Mad women fight back"; "Bet your ass we’re paranoid" - Psychiatric survivors during a protest in 1976

dynamicafrica:

vintageblackbeauty:

Danseuse de la région de Mobaye (Oubangui)
Jeune fille du village de Poto-Poto avec une coiffure de perles. Elève de la mission catholique, répondant au nom “”d’Héliani”“, elle fut repéré par Ellebé lors d’un tam-tam (fête) à Poto-Poto et devint un de ses modèles pour une série de photographies intitulée “”Eve noire”“.
1943, Congo

Going to attempt to translate this as best as I can (feel free to correct me):
Dancer from the Mobaye region (Oubangui)
Young girl from the village of Poto-Poto with a hairstyle of pearls. Student at the Catholic mission, who responds to the name “Heilani”, she was spotted by Ellebe at a tam-tam festival/celebration at Poto-Poto and became one of his models for a photographic series titled, “Black Eve”.
Highly disturbing eroticism and exoticism at its finest. After some quick searching, I came across this blog entry that gives some background behind the intent of this photographic series (book here), and sheds some further light on the issue of black women’s (naked) bodies, and other non-Western women, as subjects for the intense, and at times perverse, sexual desires and fantasies of white men.
There’s just something about “Heilani’s” expression, and the intense gaze of the white men in the background on her nude body, that embodies this fetish.
Opinions welcome.
- DynamicAfrica

dynamicafrica:

vintageblackbeauty:

Danseuse de la région de Mobaye (Oubangui)

Jeune fille du village de Poto-Poto avec une coiffure de perles. Elève de la mission catholique, répondant au nom “”d’Héliani”“, elle fut repéré par Ellebé lors d’un tam-tam (fête) à Poto-Poto et devint un de ses modèles pour une série de photographies intitulée “”Eve noire”“.

1943, Congo

Going to attempt to translate this as best as I can (feel free to correct me):

Dancer from the Mobaye region (Oubangui)

Young girl from the village of Poto-Poto with a hairstyle of pearls. Student at the Catholic mission, who responds to the name “Heilani”, she was spotted by Ellebe at a tam-tam festival/celebration at Poto-Poto and became one of his models for a photographic series titled, “Black Eve”.

Highly disturbing eroticism and exoticism at its finest. After some quick searching, I came across this blog entry that gives some background behind the intent of this photographic series (book here), and sheds some further light on the issue of black women’s (naked) bodies, and other non-Western women, as subjects for the intense, and at times perverse, sexual desires and fantasies of white men.

There’s just something about “Heilani’s” expression, and the intense gaze of the white men in the background on her nude body, that embodies this fetish.

Opinions welcome.

- DynamicAfrica

ladyfabulous:

fleetwytchmac:

decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies.

CREEPY.

This gives a whole new level of creepiness to when random men tell you to smile.

ladyfabulous:

fleetwytchmac:

decadentlullaby:

When women used to be depressed or were not “taking care of their men” properly their husbands could send them to the psych ward for attitude adjustments. This was part of conditioning them to always wear a smile. They believed that if a woman saw herself smiling that it would become natural practice and that she would be “cured”. This often went along with shock therapies.

CREEPY.

This gives a whole new level of creepiness to when random men tell you to smile.

historicaltimes:

Female Indian telephone switchboard operator, Helen of Many Glacier Hotel, June 1925.

historicaltimes:

Female Indian telephone switchboard operator, Helen of Many Glacier Hotel, June 1925.

greencarnations:

spacethefinalfuck:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

this is fab BUT WHERE ARE THEIR NAMES?

I’m always wanting to read more about these posts immediately and I have trouble finding the sources.

hadaes:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

this is awesome

hadaes:

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

this is awesome

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman
1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.
2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”
4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.
5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poems, comic books, and films.
6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events. 

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.
But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman

1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.

2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

Harriet_Tubman_Reward_Notice_1849.jpg

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.

5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poemscomic books, and films.

6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.

But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

indypendent-thinking:

1932, Chinese-American pilots Hazel Ying Lee and Virginia Wong (via You May Not Know About The First Chinese Americans, But You Should)

indypendent-thinking:

1932, Chinese-American pilots Hazel Ying Lee and Virginia Wong (via You May Not Know About The First Chinese Americans, But You Should)

vancity604778kid:

ultrafacts:




Source Click HERE to Follow the Ultrafacts Blog!




ALICE ROOSEVELT WAS HARDCORE. “She was known as a rule-breaker in an era when women were under great pressure to conform. The American public noticed many of her exploits. She smoked cigarettes in public, swore at officials, rode in cars with men, stayed out late partying, kept a pet snake named Emily Spinach (Emily as in her spinster aunt and Spinach for its green color) in the White House, and was seen placing bets with a bookie. 

vancity604778kid:

ultrafacts:

Source Click HERE to Follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

ALICE ROOSEVELT WAS HARDCORE. “She was known as a rule-breaker in an era when women were under great pressure to conform. The American public noticed many of her exploits. She smoked cigarettes in public, swore at officials, rode in cars with men, stayed out late partying, kept a pet snake named Emily Spinach (Emily as in her spinster aunt and Spinach for its green color) in the White House, and was seen placing bets with a bookie. 

daniellemertina:

porygonluva:

hi, so, uh

I assume a lot of people are hailing joan rivers as a feminist icon mainly because she opened comedy up to women through her standup

but, uh, unsurprisingly she was not the first to do that

image

that’s moms mabley. she was a comedian in the…